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ICFSR 2015: INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON FRAILTY & SARCOPENIA RESEARCH THURSDAY - SATURDAY, APRIL 23-25, 2015 BOSTON, MA, USA

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J Frailty Aging 2015;4(S1):19-108

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THE GREEN TEA POLYPHENOL EPIGALLOCATECHIN-3-GALLATE (EGCG) ATTENUATES SKELETAL MUSCLE ATROPHY IN A RAT MODEL OF SARCOPENIA

B.M. Meador, K.A. Mirza, M. Tian, M.B. Skelding, L.A. Reaves, N.K. Edens, M.J. Tisdale, S.L. Pereira

J Frailty Aging 2015;4(4):209-215

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Objective: Sarcopenia—the loss of muscle mass and functionality occurring with age—is a pervasive problem with few effective treatments beyond exercise. We examined the ability of the green tea catechin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg), to impact muscle mass and the molecular pathway involved in muscle atrophy in a rat model of sarcopenia. Methods: 20-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats were treated for 8 weeks with control diet or control plus 200mg/kg body weight of EGCg diet. Results: EGCg-supplemented animals had significantly greater gastrocnemius muscle mass than the aged controls, and showed a trend for increased muscle fiber cross-sectional areas (CSA) (p=0.06). These changes were associated with significantly lower protein expressions of the intramuscular 19S and 20S proteasome subunits and the MuRF1 and MAFbx ubiquitin ligases in the EGCg-treated animals. Proteasome activity as determined by ‘Chymotrypsin-like’ enzyme activity was also significantly reduced by EGCg. Muscle mRNA expression of IL-15 and IGF-1 were significantly increased in the EGCg group vs. the aged controls. In comparison to younger adult animals (6 month), the protein expression of 19S, 20S, MuRF1, MAFbx, and myostatin were increased between approximately 4- and 12-fold in the aged controls, but only up to ~2-fold in the aged EGCg animals. Conclusions: EGCg supplementation was able to preserve muscle in sarcopenic rats, partly through attenuating protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, together with increased expression of anabolic factors.

CITATION:
B.M. Meador ; K.A. Mirza ; M. Tian ; M.B. Skelding ; L.A. Reaves ; N.K. Edens ; M.J. Tisdale ; S.L. Pereira (2015): The green tea polyphenol Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg) attenuates skeletal muscle atrophy in a rat model of sarcopenia. The Journal of Frailty and Aging (JFA). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jfa.2015.58

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ICFSR 2016: INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON FRAILTY & SARCOPENIA RESEARCH THURSDAY - FRIDAY, APRIL 28-29, 2016 PHILADELPHIA, PA, USA

Abstract

J Frailty Aging 2016;5(S1):15-128

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ASSOCIATION BETWEEN CONTINUOUS WEARABLE ACTIVITY MONITORING AND SELF-REPORTED FUNCTIONING IN ASSISTED LIVING FACILITY AND NURSING HOME RESIDENTS

J. Merilahti, I. Korhonen

J Frailty Aging 2016;5(4):225-232

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Background: Physical functioning is a key factor in independent living, and its preclinical state assessment and monitoring during the subject’s normal life would be beneficial. Objectives: The aim of the study is to analyse associations between ambulatory measured physical activity behaviour and sleep patterns (wrist actigraphy) and self-reported difficulties in performing activities of daily living. Participants, setting and design: 36 residents in assisted living facilities and nursing homes (average age=80.4±9.0 years) without dementia in free living conditions participated. Actigraphic monitoring is integrated with the facilities’ social alarm system. Measurements: Indices on activity level, activity rhythm, sleep pattern and external stimuli response of sleep-wake behaviours were extracted from the actigraph data and correlated (Spearman rank-order correlation) with activities of daily living measures. Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was applied. Results: Activity level (ρ=-0.49, p<0.05) and night-time activity variance (ρ=-0.69, p<0.01) had correlation with the activities of daily living scores. The similarity of subject-wise activity pattern to facility common activities had a trend with activities of daily living (ρ=-0.44, p<0.1). In longitudinal case analysis, sleep and activity patterns were found to be associated with local weather variables. Conclusions: Activity patterns as measured by actigraphy may provide objective information on older people’s behaviour related to functioning state and its changes in nursing home and assisted living facility settings. However, variance between individuals was large in this dataset which decreases the reliability of the results. Furthermore, external stimuli such as weather and facility-related activities can affect subjects’ activity and sleep behaviour and should be considered in the related studies as well.

CITATION:
J. Merilahti ; I. Korhonen (2016): Association between continuous wearable activity monitoring and self-reported functioning in assisted living facility and nursing home residents. The Journal of Frailty and Aging (JFA). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jfa.2016.102

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ASSESSMENT OF HEALTH INEQUALITIES AMONG OLDER PEOPLE USING THE EPICES SCORE: A COMPOSITE INDEX OF SOCIAL DEPRIVATION

B. Bongue, A. Colvez, E. Amsallem, L. Gerbaud, C. Sass

J Frailty Aging 2016;5(3):168-173

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Background: Most of the indicators commonly used to assess social deprivation are poorly suited to study health inequalities in older people. The EPICES (Evaluation of Deprivation and Inequalities in Health Examination Centres) score is a new composite index commonly used to measure individual deprivation. Objective: To assess the relationships between health indicators and the EPICES score in older people. Design, Setting, and participants: We performed a cross-sectional study using the data from the 2008 ESPS Survey (Health, HealthCare and Insurance Survey). Of the 4235 survey respondents aged 60 and over in 2008, 2754 completed the 11 items of the EPICES score and were included in the study. Main outcomes and measures: Deprivation was measured using the EPICES score. Health indicators were: Disability, physical performance, cognitive decline, self-perceived health status, and health-care use and participation in prevention programs (missing teeth not replaced, healthcare renunciation, no hemoccult test [60-75 years] and no mammography [60-75 years]). Results: Of the 4235 survey respondents aged 60 and over in 2008, 2754 completed the 11 items of the EPICES score and were included in the study. The mean age was 70.5± 8.2 years. 52.8% were women. 25.8% were living in poor households. According to the EPICES score, 35.1% were deprived. The EPICES score is linked to all the health indicators assessed in this study: Physical disability, cognitive decline; lifestyle and health care accessibility. These relationships increase steadily with the level of social deprivation. For example, the risk of having difficulties in walking 500m without help or an assistive device is multiplied by 13 (RR=13.5 [7.9-20.8]) in the elderly of quintile 5 (maximum precariousness). Limitations: The observational nature limits inferences about causality. Conclusion: The EPICES score is linked to health indicators. It could be a useful instrument to assess health inequalities in older people living in the community.

CITATION:
B. Bongue ; A. Colvez ; E. Amsallem ; L. Gerbaud ; C. Sass (2016): Assessment of health inequalities among older people using the EPICES score: a composite index of social deprivation. The Journal of Frailty and Aging (JFA). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jfa.2016.96

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2017

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2016

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2015

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2014

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2013

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2012

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