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METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES AND THE IMPACT OF AGE STRATIFICATION ON THE PROPORTION OF PARTICIPANTS WITH LOW APPENDICULAR LEAN MASS WHEN ADJUSTING FOR HEIGHT AND FAT MASS USING LINEAR REGRESSION: RESULTS FROM THE CANADIAN LONGITUDINAL STUDY ON AGING

A.J. Mayhew, S.M. Phillips, N. Sohel, L. Thabane, P.D. McNicholas, R.J. de Souza, G. Parise, P. Raina

Background: Using residual values calculated from models regressing appendicular lean mass on fat mass and height is one of several suggested strategies for adjusting appendicular lean mass for body size when measuring sarcopenia. However, special consideration is required when using this technique in different subgroups in order to capture the correct individuals as sarcopenic. Objectives: To provide guidance about how to conduct stratified analyses for the regression adjustment technique using age groups as an example. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Data collected at baseline (2012-2015) for the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging. Participants: Community dwelling participants of European descent aged 45 to 85 years (n=25,399). Measurements: Appendicular lean mass, height, and weight were measured. Sex-specific residuals were calculated in participants before and after stratifying participants by age group (45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-85 years). Cut offs corresponding to the sex-specific 20th percentile residual values in participants ≥65 years were determined first in the residuals calculated in all participants and residuals calculated in only those aged ≥65 years. For each set of cut offs, the percentage of age and sex-stratified participants with low appendicular lean mass were compared for the residuals calculated in all participants and the residuals calculated after stratifying by age. Results: In 12,622 males and 12,737 females, regardless of the cut off used, the percentage of participants with low appendicular lean mass decreased with age when residuals were calculated after age stratification. When the residuals were calculated in all participants, the percentage of participants with sarcopenia increased from the youngest to the oldest age groups. Conclusions: Sex-specific residuals in all participants should be calculated prior to stratifying the sample by age group, or other stratification variables, for the purposes of developing appendicular lean mass cut offs or subgroup analyses.

CITATION:
A.J. Mayhew ; S.M. Phillips ; N. Sohel ; L. Thabane ; P.D. McNicholas ; R.J. de Souza ; G. Parise ; P. Raina (2020): METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES AND THE IMPACT OF AGE STRATIFICATION ON THE PROPORTION OF PARTICIPANTS WITH LOW APPENDICULAR LEAN MASS WHEN ADJUSTING FOR HEIGHT AND FAT MASS USING LINEAR REGRESSION: RESULTS FROM THE CANADIAN LONGITUDINAL STUDY ON AGING. The Journal of Frailty and Aging (JFA). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jfa.2020.48

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