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ASSESSMENT OF HEALTH INEQUALITIES AMONG OLDER PEOPLE USING THE EPICES SCORE: A COMPOSITE INDEX OF SOCIAL DEPRIVATION

B. Bongue, A. Colvez, E. Amsallem, L. Gerbaud, C. Sass

J Frailty Aging 2016;5(3):168-173

Background: Most of the indicators commonly used to assess social deprivation are poorly suited to study health inequalities in older people. The EPICES (Evaluation of Deprivation and Inequalities in Health Examination Centres) score is a new composite index commonly used to measure individual deprivation. Objective: To assess the relationships between health indicators and the EPICES score in older people. Design, Setting, and participants: We performed a cross-sectional study using the data from the 2008 ESPS Survey (Health, HealthCare and Insurance Survey). Of the 4235 survey respondents aged 60 and over in 2008, 2754 completed the 11 items of the EPICES score and were included in the study. Main outcomes and measures: Deprivation was measured using the EPICES score. Health indicators were: Disability, physical performance, cognitive decline, self-perceived health status, and health-care use and participation in prevention programs (missing teeth not replaced, healthcare renunciation, no hemoccult test [60-75 years] and no mammography [60-75 years]). Results: Of the 4235 survey respondents aged 60 and over in 2008, 2754 completed the 11 items of the EPICES score and were included in the study. The mean age was 70.5± 8.2 years. 52.8% were women. 25.8% were living in poor households. According to the EPICES score, 35.1% were deprived. The EPICES score is linked to all the health indicators assessed in this study: Physical disability, cognitive decline; lifestyle and health care accessibility. These relationships increase steadily with the level of social deprivation. For example, the risk of having difficulties in walking 500m without help or an assistive device is multiplied by 13 (RR=13.5 [7.9-20.8]) in the elderly of quintile 5 (maximum precariousness). Limitations: The observational nature limits inferences about causality. Conclusion: The EPICES score is linked to health indicators. It could be a useful instrument to assess health inequalities in older people living in the community.

CITATION:
B. Bongue ; A. Colvez ; E. Amsallem ; L. Gerbaud ; C. Sass (2016): Assessment of health inequalities among older people using the EPICES score: a composite index of social deprivation. The Journal of Frailty and Aging (JFA). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jfa.2016.96

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